Court Ruling Emphasizes Importance of Reading the Insurance Policy as a Whole

Insurance policies contain technical language that often varies from its everyday meaning. When a case depends on the meaning of the insurance policy fine print, how you interpret these technical terms can decide the outcome of a case.

One way to define insurance policy terms is to see how those terms are used elsewhere in the insurance policy. The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals’ August 17, 2020 ruling in Engineered Structures, Inc. v. Travelers Property Casualty Company of America is a good illustration.

Engineered Structures, Inc. (ESI) was a construction firm that purchased a “builder’s risk policy” from Travelers insurance. The policy covered risks of damage when ESI was building a Fred Meyer gas station in Portland, Oregon.

ESI made a claim under the policy when an underground fuel storage tank ESI’s subcontractor was installing was improperly placed in the ground. The tank was loaded with inadequate ballast. After a rainstorm, the tank floated in the excavation hole, causing damages.

Travelers denied coverage under a policy exclusion for “faulty, inadequate or defective workmanship or construction”. ESI sued Travelers claiming the denial violated the policy and was made in bad faith. The issue depended on what the word “construction” in the exclusion meant. ESI said “construction” meant the finished product it was building, so the exclusion only applied for defects in the finished product.

Certain rules come into play when an insurance term of art is ambiguous, but the court determined those rules didn’t apply because it could understand the term “construction” by reading other language in the policy.  The court examined other language in the insurance policy that treated “construction” as referring to the process of building the gas station. The policy defined certain “construction activities” in terms of the actions taken in the course of constructing the gas station. The court interpreted the word “construction” in the exclusion as referring to the process of constructing the gas station, as opposed to the final product that was built.

This emphasizes the principle that insurance policy language must be read in the context of the entire insurance policy. Where the policy uses technical language in one place, it can often be understood only by reviewing similar language elsewhere in the policy. A few other references to a disputed term elsewhere in the policy can decide insurance coverage for a huge loss.

 

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